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File 144299716091.jpg - (119.88KB , 900x1600 , 20150922_172002.jpg )
16251 No. 16251 ID: 7443a9 hide watch expand quickreply [Reply]
Sup guys,

So one of the things I like to do is about once or twice a year is buy myself something nice...something pricey. I decided that this year is would be a watch. What I wanted was a basic manually wound mechanical watch. I spent a couple of months researching and finally decided on buying a Weiss Watch Co. Field Watch. I was going go with the slightly cheaper Hamilton field watch that fit the same criteria but I decided I wanted to help out the small American business more and I liked the Weiss's dial better.

The good:
Higher quality finish than I was expecting. Most pics online are of his first pieces and while he hasn't changed anything major in the design he has come a LONG way in the finishing of the watch.
The sapphire front and back. Not only are they super scratch resistant but being able to see the mechanism is pretty cool.
The weight is also something to comment on. For the size of this watch (42mm) it is light on my wrist.
Lastly while it comes close it is not too big for me to wear like most 42mm watches.

The bad:
No hacking seconds. I'm not sure you can actually call this a real field watch without that capability. On a TAC mission you HAVE to be within +/- 30seconds of your L-Hour or you can get yourself or other people killed. Not that we use wrist watches for timing that nowadays but I would have liked to actually do a time hack next brief I was in for the lulz. I guess for most people today it's a non issue but really it would be nice for historical accuracy.

The neutral:
He calls the movement the "Caliber 1001". I feel this is a bit dishonest. The movement is a ETA UNITAS 6497 that he disassembles, polishes, etches, and "modifies" (not that I can find what that entails anywhere. But I honestly don't care enough to ask) before reassembling & regulating. I think he should hold off on the naming before he reaches his stated goal of making his own movements.
Message too long. Click here to view the full text.
19 posts and 9 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>> No. 17390 ID: 51e25e
File 146338713679.jpg - (3.40MB , 4000x2992 , IMG_20160513_000831.jpg )
17390
It wears equally nice on a NATO as well. I plan on eventually getting the Sinn bracelet or a deployment clasp rubber.
>> No. 17418 ID: 818111
My Stocker and Yale "mickey mouse" watch died.

Had it since tech. Who can get it working? Tritium is long dead, if that matters.
>> No. 17422 ID: bec165
>>17418

Any competent watch maker should be able to help you out.
>> No. 17423 ID: f87148
>>17388

Fuck me, I could look at automatics' asses all damn day.

I just got a Seiko 5 about six months ago, and for ~$70, I couldn't be happier. I'll post photos when I get a halfway decent camera.
>> No. 17912 ID: 1d4d8c
>>16251
What band is that?


File 148169118440.jpg - (644.52KB , 2188x1877 , o2524875.jpg )
17894 No. 17894 ID: 4c768d hide watch expand quickreply [Reply]
Any ideas what he has attached to his under barrel?
3 posts and 1 image omitted. Click Reply to view.
>> No. 17898 ID: c5dfe3
File 14817170486.jpg - (685.78KB , 2103x2650 , US XM-2 Personnel Detector detects urine & swe.jpg )
17898
The first version of the People Sniffer was the XM-2 personnel detector man-pack (also known as the E63 man-pack personnel detector). The XM-2 consisted of a backpack-mounted sensor, coupled with an air intake tube mounted on the end of a M16 rifle. Deployed during 1967, reports are that the XM-2 was often a bit too sensitive, and would only pick up the sweat odors of its user. This, coupled with the rather loud “ticka-ticka-ticka” noise that sensor made while in use rather gave the whole game away. Understandably, troops were uncomfortable carrying a heavy noisemaker into an ambush zone. So the XM-2 man-portable system gave way to the much more powerful XM-3 airborne platform, normally mounted on a helicopter. The XM-3 delivered much better results, although the Viet Cong eventually learned ways to deceive the device’s ability to detect sweat, urine and campfire smoke.

If you can find an XM-2 “personnel detector” out there somewhere, it will make a great accessory for your vintage M16A1 rifle—granted you can find one of those.
>> No. 17899 ID: c5dfe3
  U.S. soldier with E63 personnel detector, receives maintenance assistance from another soldier in the field. https://youtu.be/ZdHyKPTHgVs

A US Army 1st Air Cavalry Division soldier equipped with an E63 personnel detector manpack, advances through a jungle area during training in Ankhe, South Vietnam. He signals to his buddy, that his E63 is malfunctioning. He assumes an alert defensive posture, as his buddy opens the manpack and checks its internal components. Interior view of the E63 shows air transport fan and chemicals. Location: Ankhe South Vietnam. Date: February 1, 1967.
>> No. 17900 ID: c5dfe3
  US Army 1st Air Cavalry Division soldier with an E63 personnel detector, in Ankhe, South Vietnam. https://youtu.be/4kGpf9W5s3c

A US 1st Air Cavalry Division soldier equipped with an E63 (XM-2) personnel detector manpack. The E63 intake tube is mounted to the barrel of his M-16 rifle and a signal cord runs from the backpack to a speaker under his helmet. The soldier advances slowly through an area of heavy brush, during training in Ankhe, South Vietnam. Another soldier moves in the background. Location: Ankhe South Vietnam. Date: January 31, 1966.
>> No. 17901 ID: c5dfe3
File 148172646119.jpg - (144.74KB , 815x639 , US trooper dog in the paddies, 101 Airborne.jpg )
17901
I prefer this Vietnam War-era personnel detector.
>> No. 17902 ID: c5dfe3
File 148172657148.jpg - (1.23MB , 2849x2243 , US trooper dog in Vietnam.jpg )
17902
Inexpensive to produce, but the training costs are high.


File 148110331521.jpg - (304.99KB , 1200x900 , 1481102145001.jpg )
17838 No. 17838 ID: 6342c8 hide watch expand quickreply [Reply]
You are in a wrong neighborhood, Nigga
3 posts and 3 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>> No. 17842 ID: 6342c8
File 148110358760.jpg - (132.65KB , 870x580 , 1481101441004.jpg )
17842
More tacticool for god of tacticool
>> No. 17843 ID: 6342c8
File 148110362681.jpg - (305.82KB , 1200x1200 , 1481101291001.jpg )
17843
Simple grunts ain't look that fancy
>> No. 17844 ID: 6342c8
File 148110370719.jpg - (280.92KB , 958x718 , 1481100417002.jpg )
17844
Food grunting.

Note ODKB desert digicamo.
>> No. 17845 ID: 6342c8
File 148110382974.jpg - (203.90KB , 900x600 , 1481100742001.jpg )
17845
More combat engineers.
>> No. 17888 ID: c550c6
File 148143889311.jpg - (102.75KB , 870x580 , f0278443_57387b050c07f.jpg )
17888
>>17840
>>17842
>collimating NV optic with non-adjustable width eyepieces

Not exactly the best design


No. 17444 ID: ce2b82 hide watch expand quickreply [Reply] [Last 50 posts]
  Rations!
What's good? What's bad? What's easy to make yourself?
I chanced upon videos of this guy, Steve1989 MREinfo, who tastes and reviews military rations, from old survival food packs from WW2, C-rats from the Vietnam War and modern MREs from around the world.

This Norwegian reindeer stew ration got some terrific marks. Even the instant coffee, toffee bars and chocolate were amazingly good.
2016 Norwegian Arctic Field Ration Reindeer Casserole Game Stew MRE Review Military https://youtu.be/7fmLlkfGQ_0
52 posts and 25 images omitted. Click Reply to view.
>> No. 17850 ID: eefa98
File 148113234559.jpg - (101.41KB , 1024x768 , rations US MCI 1980 Menu 4 Pork Sliced Cooked with.jpg )
17850
>> No. 17851 ID: eefa98
File 148113245026.jpg - (92.74KB , 1024x768 , rations US MCI 1980 Menu 4 Pork Sliced Cooked with.jpg )
17851
A leaky can of sliced pork cooked with juices 36+ years old? Don't risk it!
>> No. 17852 ID: eefa98
File 148113248078.jpg - (150.18KB , 1024x770 , rations US MCI 1980 Menu 4 Pork Sliced Cooked with.jpg )
17852
>> No. 17853 ID: eefa98
File 148113251338.jpg - (113.65KB , 1024x754 , rations US MCI 1980 Menu 4 Pork Sliced Cooked with.jpg )
17853
>> No. 17854 ID: eefa98
  1993 Frozen For 15 years Preserved MRE Pork Rice & BBQ Sauce Ration Pack US Military Food Review https://youtu.be/PiErAgbwH3Q
Howdy, folks! This time we got a Pork & Rice W/ BBQ Sauce MRE from 1993 that has been frozen for the last 15 years (Actually just talked to Jerry, the dude I got 'em from and he told me up to 20 years) and this experiment was a 100% success! This thing looks and tastes like it was made last year! Even the applesauce was in perfect shape! Absolutely amazing MRE review for that reason alone and totally worth watching, you won't be disappointed.


File 14778339832.png - (74.75KB , 1045x1010 , p124-125.png )
17752 No. 17752 ID: 1e7323 hide watch expand quickreply [Reply]
Reading a little about Russian forces and found they abandoned footwraps in the late 2000's[1]. I found that a little surprising so I looked up why. Is it crazy to use a footwrap in lieu of modern socks for thinks like hiking and camping? Did the Russians hold on to it for traditions sake or are us spoiled westerners with our fancy industry missing out?

Pros[2]:
- They are easy to wash and they dry quickly
- One universal "size" fits the foot of any adult human
- They can be disinfected by boiling and ironing without suffering any damage.
- There is no need to search for a mate to form a pair.
- They can be easily fabricated in the field from most any material at hand.
- They can continue to be safely used after localized wear by simply shifting to an area without holes or tears.
- They are extremely durable, especially when fabricated from wool or felt.

Cons:
- Can cause blisters
- Socks are cheap

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>> No. 17821 ID: 044fd0
File 148071612068.jpg - (82.58KB , 640x475 , 1453435806-5-12573100_1148558651863300_75575699853.jpg )
17821
>>17819

When I'm camping I'll often take a GI wool blanket, fold the narrow end down about 6 or 8 inches or so to form a collar and fasten it at the neck with a large safety pin. I find this quite cozy.

Alternatively you could find yourself an Afghan Patu.
>> No. 17823 ID: 5a1acb
File 148085234960.jpg - (325.50KB , 900x1448 , Viking_trader_by_VendelRus.jpg )
17823
>>17819
I feel you. Sometimes I wish I could dress more like pic related.

Capes could make a comeback. The modern wardrobe is just designed for fashion anyways, often at the cost of function and comfort. Superheros and medieval fantasy are popular these days.

Look at jeans, they're inferior to other options in nearly every aspect. They're heavy, sponge like, restrictive, average to high in cost, even the pockets suck to use.

Maybe the sock is better than the foot wrap, but I'm sure we make some functionally poor choices else where. If you still think jeans are great, try on a pair of high heels.
>> No. 17824 ID: 3f7131
File 148094740526.jpg - (278.24KB , 1536x2048 , 111.jpg )
17824
For winter camping I've sewn a full on cloak out of old wool blankets. When it's 5 degrees and you're sleeping in the middle of the woods, who really gives a crap how you're dressed? It's heavy, sure, but so much dead air. Like small swords and capes, they aren't any less effective, just less... socially acceptable.
>> No. 17834 ID: fb3bdd
>>17820
You can't cut a main in twain with a smallsword!
>> No. 17890 ID: 5556d0
>>17834
Pox to that. Nary a need to have a man cloven in twide whenas smallsword thro his offal.

I wonder how many litfags that mess will piss off. Probably all of them.


File 146289667374.jpg - (48.12KB , 478x640 , anorak.jpg )
17379 No. 17379 ID: 244c85 hide watch expand quickreply [Reply]
How much do TAD Anoraks run for these days? I know they're basically impossible to find, and I image the wear on it would make it kinda not worth the cash.

Didn't they go for like less than a hundred though at the time?
4 posts and 1 image omitted. Click Reply to view.
>> No. 17424 ID: cad48c
I've got a couple of TAD items and TBH neither have impressed me overmuch. The fleece gets cut through by a breeze, and the hardshell just hasn't held up well at all. I've had to glue the fucker back together and it's managed to start pilling up at contact points. I expected to have to re-apply DWR a few times, but thought it'd be pretty bombproof otherwise given the price.
>> No. 17425 ID: 82b738
File 146491348279.jpg - (2.81MB , 3264x2448 , 14649133689912045640519.jpg )
17425
Knockoff jacket came in last week. Wore it camping, I'll post more photos later.
>> No. 17443 ID: 0fa6d7
>>17425

I'd be interested in knowing which knockoffs are good & which aren't.
>> No. 17509 ID: c550c6
File 146808482555.jpg - (393.03KB , 1600x1426 , s-l1600.jpg )
17509
>>17443
This was the one I bought:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/261471617783?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&var=560812945198&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

I wear an XL, bought the 3XL because lolAsian sizes and it fits me perfectly.
>> No. 17822 ID: 1b69e9
>>17381

Pretty much this. They have a huge sale going on this weekend and while I was browsing their site the only product that I think commands its price point is their stealth hoodie LT since no one else makes a tacticool jacket in c_change which is alot more breathable than goretex. For everything else Id rather spend my money on arc'teryx, cause deadbird shit is legit high quality.


File 147699542652.jpg - (3.73MB , 4160x2340 , 20161020_150706.jpg )
17741 No. 17741 ID: 090689 hide watch quickreply [Reply]
Let's talk CBRN equipment.
>> No. 17742 ID: 454a4b
File 147707621046.jpg - (23.53KB , 224x350 , 1361036197160.jpg )
17742
You start. ;)
>> No. 17743 ID: 0adaa6
File 147709104288.jpg - (38.81KB , 500x500 , TE057_500_1.jpg )
17743
>>17741
is this still top of the line or have we advanced again that i did not know about?
http://www.galls.com/cgi/CGBCSTYL?PMSTYL=TE057
>> No. 17817 ID: 5a1acb
File 148015063999.jpg - (641.52KB , 2449x2560 , ghost-hunting-geiger-counter.jpg )
17817
There was a really good thread on this back in the day. Think it was under outdoor/survival sadly. Long thread short, detection was the hardest part. Then followed by maintaining a decontamination/clean room.

Makes me wonder, in this age of worrying about flus, ebola, nuclear metldowns, dirty bombs, etc. (Sorry NSA) Where's our detection equipment? Sure, you can buy a gas mask, even a hazmat suit with it's own air supply. Unless you're intentionally going to expose yourself to danger or attending a rave. How would you know ahead of time to bring, or wear this gear?

Is there anything available to the public to detect these invisible threats?
>> No. 17818 ID: 044fd0
  >>17817

Geiger counters, survey meters and dosimeters are a dime a dozen. The Gamma Scout seems to be quite popular.

As for detecting chemical and biological threats there's probably litmus paper type detectors available but I don't know how useful such a thing would be without protective kit and atropine.


File 147483277979.jpg - (112.09KB , 574x960 , YoungAlanAldaHawkeyeInRSF.jpg )
17711 No. 17711 ID: fe91ea hide watch expand quickreply [Reply]
Dear OPERATORS,

I am looking for a pair of "BDU shorts"/"cargo shorts". Currently I consider products from Tru-Spec, Propper and Rothco. Since design is the same at every shop my question is about the quality of clothing (in terms of craftsmanship, materials, comfort, durability) from the aformentioned vendors - which one is worth buying? Are there any actual differences? How are the poly/cotton blends working in hot weather compared to 100% cotton?

No "capri-pants" nor any other gay-related items of clothing allowed in this thread.
2 posts and 1 image omitted. Click Reply to view.
>> No. 17723 ID: ec7ed1
File 147517052238.jpg - (858.15KB , 2560x1600 , jeans cut-offs 1.jpg )
17723
How about just making some cut-offs? Hem up the bottom where you want.
>> No. 17730 ID: e99cc7
File 147569928079.jpg - (47.05KB , 220x536 , 220px-Yvon_Chouinard__Mt_Hood.jpg )
17730
Get yourself a pair of patagonia stand-up canvas shorts. They'll last foreve rand come with a lifetime guarantee. They work great in the heat and have more than enough storage in the huge front and back pockets.
>> No. 17756 ID: afbf4f
>>17730
Seconded. They're great shorts.
>> No. 17814 ID: 89d360
>>17730

p.s.

Dem boots
>> No. 17815 ID: 5a1acb
I'm currently wearing some truspec, with a zippered fly. I've had them for a few years now with regular weekend wear and they're still good as new. Pretty great pants, would buy again.

Poly-cotton is great, it's still quite durable, while feeling like summer shorts. 100% cotton is closer to wearing jeans, it's heavier, stiffer, and takes longer to dry.


File 147224534955.png - (4.50MB , 1583x4545 , RH Preyda Deluxe Honing Kit Massdrop.png )
17647 No. 17647 ID: c5ecc5 hide watch expand quickreply [Reply]
I have never sharpened a knife before. Is this what I want?

https://www.massdrop.com/buy/rh-preyda-deluxe-honing-kit
3 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>> No. 17655 ID: dda126
>>17652
>To sharpen or polish

it's the same thing if you don't let a knife get dull but just touch it up after some use. ofc, if you wreck an edge you'll need a rough whetstone first. I don't really use knives but I keep them polished razor sharp and greased up to prevent oxidation which kinda tends to creep up on an edge in the dampy conditions of my 5.11 pants.
>> No. 17669 ID: c5ecc5
I just bought the large kit last night. I doubt I'm going to need to sharpen anything right away, though.
>> No. 17681 ID: 22504e
>>17650
>>17655

wat.

>>17647
99% of the time, all you need is to reset the edge. To do this, you hone it, like with one of those chef's steels. Other than that, just use waterstones. Be sure to let it soak for a min or two submerged in water before starting. Often, also, cheaper stones are not very flat, and need to be flattened before hand. You can rub two stones together to do this, as they will wear away at the high spots first. When sharpening, don't use heavy pressure, especially if you are using a finer stone. Let the grit do its work. Very little material needs to be removed generally anyway. Also don't get too autistic with it unless you are using this for culinary purposes (or so I hear, I am no chef) or shaving. A true razor's edge won't survive 10 seconds of real work.
>> No. 17812 ID: e517e3
If you don't know what to use or how to sharpen, I would strongly recommend against doing so and learning with free-hand. Yes, having an understanding and practical experience with doing it by hand is a good foundation to be able to revert to - but it also means a lot of trial and error and learning when and where you're fucking up. And many people aren't even aware of when they do.

The stones seem decent. Arkansas stones are good and will work and perform well on a myriad amount of steels. Stay the fuck away from aluminum-oxide (corundum) stones, however. Ceramic and diamond are king as far as I'm concerned.

As far as "systems" go, of the ones I've bought and used the two best are the Lanksy sharpener and the DMT Aligner. DMT Aligner, especially, is pretty fucking boss and well designed (DMT's diamond stones are also very, very good). Lansky has diamond hones as well and is more versatile and cheaper. Look into which works for you. Whatever you get, make sure you have angle control options.

Spyderco Sharpmaker is sub-optimal because of lack of angle control past the standard 15/20 DPS and the "medium"/gray stones that come standard are shit and useless for reprofiling - you're going to need CBN or diamond. That's about another ~$50 on top of the system to begin with. Then you'll want SF stones because they're fucking awesome to finish with - that's about $15 each (yes, you'll need two). I'd just as soon avoid. I barely use my Sharpmaker outside of specialty sharpening now.

Despite it's legion of fans (...why?), the Edge Pro and it's many clones are some of the shittiest available. I hate the living fuck out of using them. Not only does the original Edge Pro not have a clamp system (automatic disqualification due to movements therefore causing changes in your apex angle), but the clamp system clones are annoying because you have to remove the clamp and turn the blade over to do the other side. Fuck these systems. I'm baffled that people actually like them.

Next on my list is a KME system. Expensive (around $200) and there aren't a ton of options, but it seems like one of the best designed systems out there.

TL;DR version: That's okay, but it's just decent-looking stones in a wood box to make you pay more for it. I'd suggest a DMT Aligner or Lansky guided sharpener. YMMV.
>> No. 17813 ID: caf239
>>17812
I had the Lansky sharpening system. Damn good, I miss it. But I had to leave it behind in Florida because it was too heavy for my check bags.

I need to pick up a whet stone and start doing it by hand again. I got too comfortable with a sharpening system that I feel I lost my competence doing it the old fashioned way. I need to get that back.

I remember seeing whet stones at Harbor Freight. It was a glance, so I don't know if they're any good or not. I'll go investigate and see if they're worth the $2.


File 146491360466.jpg - (3.10MB , 3264x2448 , 20160602_190012.jpg )
17426 No. 17426 ID: 82b738 hide watch expand quickreply [Reply]
Just finally standardized mine
2 posts omitted. Click Reply to view.
>> No. 17496 ID: c1c101
>>17491
I don't really care to do the subload thing. Not that my fat dumb ass is going to be doing much running in the first place. But I guess that means that what running I can/will do should be as unimpaired as possible. Since it's only a israeli bandage and tq (and maybe some celox gauze) going on the belt, it won't need much real estate.

There's also no point in me standardizing to anyone else's standard, since there's no longer anyone in my local AO I trust to roll deep with.

No idea what class you mean. So I guess that's a no. A cursory google search brings up something in early August. There's really no way for me to know this far ahead of time if my work schedule will permit me to take a Monday-Tuesday class and by the time I know the class will probably be full. So I guess that's a double no.
>> No. 17757 ID: a4d0ec
Are there any good $10 trauma shears, or are the ones in the $20+ range the way to go? I only own 2 pairs and need to buy more
>> No. 17767 ID: 7e7763
>>17757
what's wrong with the $3 chinese shears?
>> No. 17768 ID: c550c6
>>17767
Any specific one on Amazon or eBay that has a good reputation?
>> No. 17811 ID: f05ad0
>>17757

EMT here.

If you're using em to cut clothes, the 10 dollar ones are fine. If you gotta cut through something thicker (the example that comes to mind for me is the harness firefighters put on you to pull you out of a car when they can't get the doors open) its probably gonna break em.

tl:dr unless you use em professionally, the cheap ones are fine


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