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File 14278688103.jpg - (378.99KB , 1536x2048 , CAM00974.jpg )
15635 No. 15635 ID: 0ec15c
A radio/general comms thread.
What do you have? What do you want? What do you like?
Base stations, mobiles, handhelds, whatever.
Any accessories or modifications you would recommend or have heard of?

Pic is a potatophone pic of my TK-2180 VHF with a Pryme mic.
Expand all images
>> No. 15637 ID: 963c4b
File 142787936456.jpg - (93.10KB , 889x619 , US trooper with a MCU 2-AP gas mask, ROGER THAT.jpg )
15637
Roger that.
>> No. 15638 ID: 1701f6
File 142789688947.jpg - (106.93KB , 1500x1500 , 61avBrCcwgL__SL1500_.jpg )
15638
What's the current state of RTL-SDR? Did the software on Windows get any better in the last year?
>> No. 15659 ID: 6d6cb1
>>15638
>Windoze
Looks like someone doesn't give a fuck about COMSEC.
>> No. 15679 ID: 0ec15c
Anyone know of a source for somewhat recent release of the Motorola RSS or CPS software? Maybe even the almighty Lab-tech versions? The usual places aren't yielding any results.
>> No. 15680 ID: 5fdcaa
I dont trust those Baofeng radios because there made and designed in China.

So if the PLA were to invade North America and or Australia and New Zealand.

There might be some hidden chip or something about the design so that the PLA/Chi-chom can hear you even if you have your frequency scrambled/coded messages. Or it could even reveal your position to the PLA/chi-coms.
>> No. 15681 ID: cd49aa
File 142855459590.png - (455.12KB , 600x700 , keep-calm-and-wear-your-tinfoil-hat.png )
15681
>>15680
>> No. 15686 ID: 5fdcaa
>>15681
Now you make me appear to be as silly as the paranoid Russian guy who critizes the Russian govt for buying French military gear such as french made kevlar helmets and body armor.

He fears that NATO will have the ability to turn on and off the body armor capability.

I just dont like buying made in China, I try to avoid as much as possible. There a few exceptions such as 100% silk clothing, Kung Fu/Coolie jacket/shirt/coat, and the "mao-suit"/Zhongsan suit.
>> No. 15687 ID: ac904b
>>15686

It's not totally paranoid. But instead of anything as insidious as a secret chip, I think they'd just have extensive knowledge of how the crypto works and how to defeat it.

>Or it could even reveal your position to the PLA/chi-coms.

Using any radios at any time will do this for any technologically sophisticated adversary.
>> No. 15688 ID: faf5b0
>>15680
>So if the PLA were to invade North America and or Australia and New Zealand.
Your radio will already have been fried in the nuclear apocalypse and the many EMPs that it will bring.
>> No. 15693 ID: 5fdcaa
>>15687
thanks,

The PLA would know the exact schmactics/designs/blue prints of the BaoFeng radios and may have some easier time to decode crypted messages/radio frequencies.
>> No. 15695 ID: cd49aa
>>15693
The design of the radio is irrelevant. If they want to break the code of an encrypted radio, it's pretty fucking easy for a technologically sophisticated nation. If they want to block radio transmissions, it's pretty fucking easy for a technologically sophisticated nation. They don't need to bug each individual radio.

Plus, if it comes down to that, I doubt the people fighting will be using Baofengs of all things. We'd be looting stores for better, hopefully weather proofed radios. Things like Uniden, Icom, Kenwood, Yaesu. I'm sure they'll be used to some capacity, but there's a reason people will be gravitating to the higher quality stuff.

Baofengs are great for what they are. A cheap way to get into amateur radio. I wish they made a base station, I'd jump on that in a heartbeat.
>> No. 15698 ID: 6d6cb1
File 142873862428.gif - (9.08KB , 518x314 , hal_with_tnc.gif )
15698
>>15680
>There might be some hidden chip or something about the design so that the PLA/Chi-chom can hear you even if you have your frequency scrambled/coded messages.
In general, it's not worth the risk for anyone to create such an "obvious" backdoor. It's like having an AES backdoor. The risk to keep that secret is far higher than the usefulness. If anything, the weakness would be "accidental" like shitty RNGs (see Intel, NIST, et cetera). Do not trust any design. Assume closed designs are either inherently flawed or are intentionally bugged.

>Or it could even reveal your position to the PLA/chi-coms.
Talk to any experienced ham. They often do this just to be assholes to people who don't have licenses, broadcast pirate radio stations, or forget to state their call sign. Finding someone who is broadcasting is FUCKING EASY. Go look up triangulation, kiddo.

>>15687
>>15693
Then just do APR with ZTP. The crypto is handled on another machine.

>>15695
>The design of the radio is irrelevant.
Depends.

>If they want to break the code of an encrypted radio, it's pretty fucking easy for a technologically sophisticated nation.
Doubt it. Crypto is strong. That's why technologically sophisticated nations tend to aim for side-channel attacks.

>If they want to block radio transmissions, it's pretty fucking easy for a technologically sophisticated nation.
It's easy enough for any normal person. Spark gap transmitters, brah.

>They don't need to bug each individual radio.
Pretty much.

Also, consider this:
They're shipping stuff to the US with this. The CIA, GCHQ, MI6, and NSA often buy electronics to check for vulnerabilities so that they can exploit it. These groups are the most well funded intelligence groups IN THE FUCKING WORLD. Why would you show your hand by selling this stuff to the common market. The point would be to strategically implement a vulnerability in a product with a more threatening force, say if you were the Chinese, you would use your communist magic to get a manufacturing contract using slave/prison labor to make the diodes for the ICs used in the military crypto RNGs. You know that since they use different specifications than the civilian designs, you can design the diode to have some leakage which would cause the RNG to have a distribution that is not entirely random (something like RC4). I mean what I said was mostly technobabble, but that should get the point across to you.

Also, all of this is sort of FUCKING POINTLESS if you're competent and use proper COMSEC by using code words and never speaking about sensitive stuff casually over the air.

Christ, you people...

>Plus, if it comes down to that, I doubt the people fighting will be using Baofengs of all things. We'd be looting stores for better, hopefully weather proofed radios. Things like Uniden, Icom, Kenwood, Yaesu. I'm sure they'll be used to some capacity, but there's a reason people will be gravitating to the higher quality stuff.
This. Kenwoods and Yaesu everywhere.

>Baofengs are great for what they are.
For ignoring the FCC requirements for not transmitting on cop frequencies, yeah. And yeah, they're cheap.
>> No. 15699 ID: cd49aa
>>15698
>Doubt it. Crypto is strong. That's why technologically sophisticated nations tend to aim for side-channel attacks.

Really? I thought it was weak relative to the technology the government has. I thought that's the reason we speak in code on comms and never talk about sensitive stuff.

>For ignoring the FCC requirements for not transmitting on cop frequencies, yeah. And yeah, they're cheap.

Would you mind elaborating? Can't you do that with any VHF radio? Or do Baofengs happen to do that without you intending to?

I appreciate the info. I've only skimmed through my radio book because I haven't had the time to read through it and prepare for the test.
>> No. 15700 ID: 360825
File 142879371097.jpg - (81.79KB , 427x640 , 1403934146593.jpg )
15700
>>15699
>Really? I thought it was weak relative to the technology the government has.
Where did you hear that?

>I thought that's the reason we speak in code on comms and never talk about sensitive stuff.
Legacy of the past that is a great supplement to proper COMSEC. Say a soldier is kill. Enemy has radio. "This is Joson" the encrypted radio crackered. "Pick up if you're there. I'm at this place on Pico Blvd called TechNoir!". Ahnuld is now hunting John Stalvern. No need to decrypt.

Now let's add code words:
Commies has kill Private Public. General Specific announces over the encrypted radio, "UM4D F466075". What the shit does that mean? Well, only Private Public knew. It was a command to collect more toilet paper since the last shipment got intercepted by Commies. This is even made better when you consolidate jobs and obfuscate further. Might want to add a Major Minor in there to spice things up as well. This also works if the crypto was broken and Privet Public is live.

>>15699
>Would you mind elaborating? Can't you do that with any VHF radio? Or do Baofengs happen to do that without you intending to?
Most commercially sold stuff have a blocker chip. IIRC, the Chinese have either upgradeable firmware which allows you to ignore the softlock on it OR it was just a diode that you needed to short. I can't remember which one it was. But in general, most HTs in the US do not allow you to transmit on pig bandwidths. You can listen in, sure, but you cannot send shit out.

>I appreciate the info. I've only skimmed through my radio book because I haven't had the time to read through it and prepare for the test.
Best wishes to you. Study well.
>> No. 15702 ID: cd49aa
>>15700
>Where did you hear that?

I made an ass of myself and assumed. I thought you could only encrypt a radio so much, plus with all the surveillance bullshit the government's into, I thought they would have a way around just about any kind of radio encryption.

Thanks for the info, I plan on getting better equipment, but I think the Baofeng's at least a decent start for my future hobby. At least good enough to take along on hikes.
>> No. 15703 ID: 5fdcaa
>>15695
I thought BaoFeng was a good high quality brand radios that was standard issue to PLA and Chinese police forces.
>> No. 15704 ID: 5fdcaa
>>15695
I thought BaoFeng was a good high quality brand radios that was standard issue to PLA and Chinese police forces.
>> No. 15709 ID: 1dcdc3
>>15704

Companies can make a variety of products. Baofeng can make an excellent radio for the PLA and sell inexpensive radios that barely meet FCC regs to US based customers...

They also have a shitload of shell companies and subsidaries, such as Anytone, TS, CTI, ect...
>> No. 15773 ID: 254d85
So getting away from Chinese radios and Chinese radio accessories (ah tell you what), since I'm planning on getting my technician license soon and then upgrading to general around December, what's a good HF transceiver to look for used? Say I have about a budget of $300-400.
>> No. 15774 ID: adfbaa
>>15773
I'm assuming you want a base?

I'd look around for some older Yaesu and Kenwood models. Look for any radio clubs in your area and see if anyone has any old gear they're willing to part with. Alternatively there's always ebay.
>> No. 15821 ID: 605421
File 143190968181.jpg - (1.58MB , 2448x3264 , SriTechCOMSEC.jpg )
15821
I have always loved mother M for day to day stuff (hammy) .. And, working on boats, it is legal as a marine vhf too.
Double duty.

Then there are the D-Star radios .. and a couple of HF radios too, for good measure
>> No. 15822 ID: aa281e
>>15821
Interested in a Motorola Radius? I've got one posted on /trade/
>> No. 15823 ID: 605421
File 143198703539.jpg - (158.00KB , 1093x892 , pdw.jpg )
15823
>>15638
Yeah, sdr# has gotten better .. DSD and DSD+ too
Of course, horsepower is key.


>15679
Torrent .. it's big. BIG.

>15680 >15693
*smh*

>>15695
Yeah .. this.
Most major name hammy stuff is good.
For those who want more (and in some ways, less), commercial gear is the way to go.

>>15773
The IC-718 comes to mind in that price range.

>>15821
sorry man .. don't have much use for one of those
Playing in P25 land is part of my current fun .. VHF and UHF
>> No. 15825 ID: ef6ae2
File 143226039769.jpg - (450.22KB , 1000x714 , wSouYqq.jpg )
15825
I'm looking at getting into ham, is there an idiots starter guide anywhere? I'm considering it for off grid/survivalist use.

1) What kind of range do you normally get with a handheld? I've read anywhere from 10-50 miles LOS but I'm guessing it varies a lot based on weather/antenna/etc. I'm looking at using it in a heavily wooded area with an antenna taller than the tree canopy.

2) Are there any good 2 channel bases (that can at least receive on 2 frequencies)?

3) Is it possible to SMS/text all or is it straight up voice only?
>> No. 15826 ID: adfbaa
>>15825
I have a few books, I'll see about uploading them in /z/ when I can. I'll post here when I do.
>> No. 15827 ID: adfbaa
>>15825
Derp, forgot. Don't know about texting, but you can definitely email. Books should answer the rest.

I haven't had time to study for the test unfortunately.
>> No. 15828 ID: adfbaa
>>15825
Okay, check /z/. That's all I have on the tablet.
>> No. 15829 ID: ef6ae2
File 143226939819.jpg - (636.63KB , 1935x2591 , Y5LoJLN.jpg )
15829
>>15828
Thanks a bunch :3
>> No. 15830 ID: ef6ae2
File 143234357171.jpg - (22.16KB , 640x392 , 640x392_58071_184603.jpg )
15830
Came across this site last night which has some more comms stuff on it

http://urbansurvivalsite.com/ebooks/
>> No. 15841 ID: 254d85
>>15823
Okay, I'll keep it in mind once I get ready for a base station.

>>15825
Right now I'm studying with the Technician class book by Gordon West, and the No Nonsense guide for General.

http://www.gordonwestradioschool.com/main/page_w5yi_training_resources.html
http://www.kb6nu.com/study-guides/
>> No. 15846 ID: 45468a
File 143270803810.jpg - (1.37MB , 2688x1520 , tmp_18341-IMAG0057-1249918461.jpg )
15846
Moving shit around, so I decided to take a mostly complete family photo. Left stack top to bottom is a Cobra 19-III CB, Radio Shack branded Midland CB, and a Cobra 29 classic CB. Handheld is a Kenwood TK-5220 VHF two-way with P25 capability. Center is an Icom 730 HF HAM, right side handheld is a Midland CB, and right side stack is two Motorola Radius 1225 VHF two-ways. Not pictured are the Kenwood TK-780 mobile, and TK-2180 handheld two-ways which are in my car.
>> No. 15906 ID: c980be
I'm thinking about one of these
http://www.twowayradioonline.com/VX8DR.asp
>> No. 15910 ID: ce25f0
>>15825
Digital packet radio bulletin boards used to be big back in the day - but it sort of fell out of fashion.

What has remained though is APRS - which uses mainly VHF digital packet radio to track GPS positions and also send text messages all over the world to amateurs. APRS is an open standard, so you can both use radios which have it built-in, and bolt on your own interfaces. You can use it with a computer (with programs like Xastir), as well as awkwardly entering one character at the time with your Yaesu VX-8 keypad.

The packet BBS software is still available, and linux comes with IP-over-amateur-radio packages so you can post cat pictures on opchan via VHF relay. Just be aware that you're not allowed to use HTTPS or visit any e-commerce sites for example. (Amateur radio is strictly non-commercial and non-encrypted; it is not supposed to compete with ISPs and phone companies.)

Even more popular than packet these days is sound card modes via programs like FLdigi; PSK-31 is good for HF, while there are much faster modes for VHF. You can even get digital radio mode apps for your smartphone, so you can hold it up to your radio speaker and send meaningful squeaking noises out on the air.

Since part of the wifi bands overlap with amateur, you can even legally modify certain wifi routers to transmit with higher power and have a sweet long-range WLAN on your forest base. The same restrictions against commercial and encrypted use apply here, though.
>> No. 15911 ID: ce25f0
>>15910
As far as I understand from the manual both the Yaesu VX-8DR and the Kenwood TH-D72 allows you to enter APRS message text using the keypad. That should be about as fast as on a cell phone with keypad, but without predictive text recognition.

That'll work for me too. Maybe I need to get myself an HT now. (I have an FT-817, but that is a bit clunky for everyday pedestrian use, also no built-in APRS)
>> No. 15912 ID: ce25f0
>>15911
Hmm. Does anyone know of the VX-8DR automatically moves the cursor to the right when you enter a character with the keypad? The TH-D72 has this as a configurable menu item (off, 1, 1.5 or 2 sec), but it looks like the VX-8DR requires you to press a button to move the cursor each time.

If this is correct, I would choose the TH-D72 if I was going to text message a lot.
>> No. 15913 ID: 044fd0
Question: FCC doesn't like encrypted traffic on their airwaves, but if one were to broadcast the ciphertext of a one-time pad would they take umbrage with that? You're not encrypting the signal, they'd hear that plain as day, they just wouldn't be able to get anything meaningful out of the string of numbers.
>> No. 15914 ID: 254d85
>>15913
http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?job=about_1&id=amateur
>Q: May my amateur station transmit codes or ciphers so as to obscure the meaning of the messages?
>No. See Section 97.211(b).

I'd imagine this also includes sending email through Winlink, so no PGP mail.

I suppose morse or data/RTTY would provide a limited amount of privacy simply because they're more esoteric.
>> No. 15916 ID: 044fd0
>>15914

Gay!

Thanks though.
>> No. 15917 ID: ce25f0
The encryption ban in amateur radio is there both to prevent criminal and espionage use, and almost more importantly to prevent it from being used for business and commercial use. You're not even allowed to speak in code on amateur radio - except brevity codes which are publicly known.

If you need encryption, use an encrypted phone or get a radio license in a service which allows encryption. Part 90 (business two-way radio) allows encryption on all bands, except the common calling frequencies (which is pretty smart as it ensures that you can call up people from other organizations).

What's good about Part 90, is that although there is a few more hoops to jump through for your group to get these radios, the individual users don't need to pass an amateur radio exam. You'd need to set up and officially register some kind of group that fits the definition of a "business" or "educational, philanthropic, or ecclesiastical institution;" and get a frequency assigned. Of course, there's also a few hundred dollars of licensing fees to pay.
>> No. 15999 ID: 605421
File 143656779735.jpg - (16.91KB , 338x138 , HROWencWMOTO.jpg )
15999
Funny you mention crypto and hammy .. lol
>> No. 16003 ID: 254d85
Or there's D-Star, which mentioning will evoke the wrath of angry greybeards and open-source types.

Anyways, got my Tech license. Kinda wish I'd had the foresight to go for General at the same time, guess I should learn morse and buy a QRP kit or something.
>> No. 16059 ID: c078a9
Everyone these days has an Android phone. Everyone can install ServalMesh on their Android phone; instant encrypted point-to-point wifi communication device that doesn't require the cell networks to function
>> No. 16060 ID: 8b2ec8
>>16059

Except there are caveats to that plan;

1.) Protected Wifi, not all Wifi is open access. Either there is encryption on the front end or a protocol is required for access.

2.) Extremely limited range. Unimpeded Wifi has an average range of 400ft. However walls, vegetation, geography, ect... severely curtail it's range.

3.) Not all Androids are compatible with ServalMesh and it requires root access with extensive permissions.

4.) If the cell network is down or unavailable, it's a 50/50 split between network lockout for emergency communications only or a loss in power. If the cell network isn't accessible because of power loss, neither will Wifi spots.

In the end, you're relying on an extremely questionable infrastructure. There are too many variables to consider it reliable.

- Accessibility to Wifi Spots

- Requires rooting & certain permissions

- Power outages

- Limited range

- Battery life of your phone, especially running ServalMesh


It's a great idea, but it needs far more support and contingencies to be considered a form of reliable communication.

It's like the Gotenna, a great concept, but I have yet to see it as a practical solution.
>> No. 16069 ID: c078a9
File 143959705361.png - (120.85KB , 850x1100 , ServalPromo.png )
16069
>>16060
>Lots of FUD...

First of all, Serval does NOT require root access, and it only requires Android 2.2 or above. Root is only needed to enable ad-hoc mesh. It works just fine without root as long as you have a router or a phone with a tethering app to act as a router.

A phone with a tethering app, can act as a "router" in this situation, even if the phone is not activated with any cell provider. You just turn on the tethering app, connect another phone to the "hotspot", and then run Serval on both phones.

This is exactly what I have been doing with two un-activated phones with no sim cards when innawoods with two other people for weeks at a time. We charge on solar.

A few phones running Serval, one running tethering app, no router, no cellular network, no root, solar panels with USB output.

Works. Just. Fine.

"Gotenna" looks poorly planned: It's as if someone saw Serval and said "hey, this needs an extra piece of hardware that adds no additional functionality!"
>> No. 16071 ID: 8b2ec8
>Lots of "I think I know what I'm doing"

>First of all, Serval does NOT require root access, and it only requires Android 2.2 or above. Root is only needed to enable ad-hoc mesh. It works just fine without root as long as you have a router or a phone with a tethering app to act as a router.

So essentially you have to establish a net, which the entire premise is based upon.

In reality, the bigger pictured is missed without the ability to establish an ad-hoc mesh.

>A phone with a tethering app, can act as a "router" in this situation, even if the phone is not activated with any cell provider. You just turn on the tethering app, connect another phone to the "hotspot", and then run Serval on both phones.

Yes, Serval uses a proprietary UI and 802.11 to communicate, it requires no cell access.

>This is exactly what I have been doing with two un-activated phones with no sim cards when innawoods with two other people for weeks at a time. We charge on solar.

Of you could buy some FRS/GMRS and have the same effect and have the required work and infrastructure, with the exception of the texting function.

>A few phones running Serval, one running tethering app, no router, no cellular network, no root, solar panels with USB output.

>Works. Just. Fine.

Sure, if you're looking to communication over a relatively short distance using a non-dedicated system.

Don't get me wrong, I love when technology is used outside it's design parameters, but Serval is a solution looking for a problem.

I can do the same thing in a static function using a few surplus CA067A/U interface units, some PCs, and MSE...or a hardwire connection...or I could use radios.

You need multiple phones, that have previously had downloaded Serval, one phone with a tethering app to act as a node...Or you could simply bring radios.

If you really wanted to be "highspeed", you could use a Ham HT (assuming your licensed) and an old phone with APRSdroid and have a real-time, tactical net you could communicate over, at a greater distance without the need for a supporting net device.

>"Gotenna" looks poorly planned: It's as if someone saw Serval and said "hey, this needs an extra piece of hardware that adds no additional functionality!"

Except "Gotenna" operates in VHF (151-154MHz); meaning it can operate at distance with a clear LOS (doesn't require a booster), and can operate Pt-Pt or in a bulletin board function.

The "extra" hardware is an antenna.

It is exactly what Serval is, a solution looking for a problem.
>> No. 16116 ID: c078a9
>>16071
>Of you could buy some FRS/GMRS

I still regret selling my FRS radios.

It is near-impossible to find FRS-only radios anymore, and I won't buy GMRS; as I will not use any band that requires a paid license.
>> No. 16117 ID: 1701f6
File 144008409338.jpg - (764.65KB , 1800x1279 , LXT560VP pack.jpg )
16117
>>16116
If you buy hybrid FRS/GMRS radios you could simply only key up on FRS bands. That would be legal and not require a license.
>> No. 16128 ID: 254d85
>>16117
That or there's MURS, which is what the aforementioned VHF frequencies the Gotenna uses (could be a major source of interference if it takes off). Of course the only MURS specific equipment I can find with a cursory search is pricey (Motorola RMM2050 or Dakota Alert M538-HT) compared to what you could get at a Walmart.
>> No. 16175 ID: 254d85
Anybody got the ARRL Handbook for Radio Communications? Thinking of picking it up so that I've got a more general dictionary for stuff.
>> No. 16177 ID: 360825
File 144134915413.gif - (461.01KB , 500x354 , 1415229102194.gif )
16177
>>16175
I just study the questions and use Wikipedia for stuff I don't know.

:/
>> No. 16178 ID: d2e752
>>16177
For some reason the ARRL book wouldn't upload. These will help, though.

http://www.operatorchan.org/z/res/2539.html
>> No. 16184 ID: 254d85
>>16177
I do the same, but I'm thinking I should put together resources for if I don't have electricity or a computer.
>> No. 16468 ID: b86cd3
So what type of equipment would you need to set up a pirate radio station?

Assume US laws don't apply :^)
>> No. 16469 ID: 8a1f2d
>>16468
What band/power/traffic? I'm guessing you mean AM/FM music, eh?
>> No. 16561 ID: 8e5828
File 144819731231.jpg - (462.54KB , 2048x1536 , t3011cx-dx.jpg )
16561
Necro bump time ...

One step closer to crypto ...
Firmware next

DES-XL
DES-OFB

Depending on mode.
Ie: analog vs digital

Good enough for most comms, it will keep all but the Lettered agencies from hearing bobkes.
>> No. 16564 ID: 1ece98
>>16561
Fuck, I'm jealous.

Question: I'm looking to set up a few Baofengs and a HAM with an old laptop so the guys and I can use them while hunting/fishing/screwing around int the bush. Any particular sets you can recommend? I figure I need a TNC unit too. I'd love to hammer out one of those compact jobs some folks have in an ammo can for practicality's sake.
>> No. 16565 ID: 254d85
>>16564
The simplest option would be to just get FRS/GMRS radios. IIRC (haven't looked at the regs in a while) friends and family can be covered by one person's GMRS license. (or if not, nobody really gives a fuck)

MURS is another option. It's a series of five VHF frequencies just above the 2 meter band meaning that it'll have slightly better propagation than the UHF FRS/GMRS radios. However equipment choices are limited and are more expensive, programming the channels into a Baofeng is a option but isn't entirely legal because they're not type certified for the frequencies.

Amateur radio requires that everybody have their own license (easy enough, $15 test fee and free study materials) and will be all you need to use for whatever Chinese radios you get. As to radios the various UV5R/F8/F9 versions are the best IMO. The UV-82 requires you to go into the settings to switch bands and uses a older version of the firmware and IMO is just inferior in general. The 8 watt "hi-power" function on some of them largely serves just to run down your battery faster as I can tell, I've done some unscientific testing (driving just out of range of a repeater on 4 watts and then switching to 8 watts) and haven't really noticed a difference.

A VHF/UHF repeater will probably be $100-600 used on eBay. Near as I can tell anybody with a GMRS or amateur radio license can put up a repeater. Though the issue with a amateur repeater is that you might not be able to find a open set of frequencies in your area. A simplex repeater would also be a option, basically it records and then retransmits 4-5 seconds later, I see some on eBay for $50 specifically for Baofengs but I have no idea if they're any good. You could also do a ghetto duplex repeater for a temporary setup by wiring two radios speaker-to-mic and setting them to VOX mode.
>> No. 16568 ID: 8e5828
File 144866794387.jpg - (228.40KB , 1536x2048 , squirrel-ops.jpg )
16568
OK .. Got it working

DES-OFB
and old style Securenet CVSD

Found the KVL at a hole-in-the-wall online surplusser
$40 on the KVL, and $30 on PROM's and a burner, ~$50 in cables and adapters

Away we gooooo

Of course we are using it someplace where we shouldn't be.
>> No. 16569 ID: 634497
>>15659

Amateur traffic must be transmitted in the clear by FCC regs anyways.

>>15700

This so much. When I was a kid, I developed a code system for my friends and I that pushed security by obscurity pretty damn far. People didn't even realize anything of importance was being communicated, because it would sound like we were just having a normal conversation about classmates or school subjects or whatever, when in fact we were communicating about whether our weed guy had any in stock or coordinating the harassment of an uncooperative kid right in front of parents and/or teachers. There were keywords and phrases which would shift conversations between modes and serve as a sort of EOF, so that (for instance) dates and times were ordinarily assumed to be taken at face value unless preceded by one of these modifiers which could have come at any time prior to the dates and times used to communicate other values sub rosa. It sounds complicated, but once you get the hang of it, it actually comes prety naturally.

>>15913

Just use EBCDIC! ;)
>> No. 16570 ID: 85f2ff
>>16569
Guys, I bought a EX DDR radio for like 25 dollars. How much did I fuck up ?

http://www.greenradio.de/htm2/e_uft422.htm

this one.
>> No. 16571 ID: 634497
>>16570

You got an interesting piece of technical history for $25. How bad could it really be?
>> No. 16572 ID: 85f2ff
>>16571

It should even be on working conditions, but I really don't know how to use this thing.
>> No. 16708 ID: 254d85
Anybody got suggestions for a simple 2m/70cm base station antenna, since even with a nice whip antenna my HT has trouble hitting the local repeaters?
>> No. 16720 ID: 5658ae
>>16561

inspiring. I think I will save up for the 3000+ to get AES encryption.
>> No. 16742 ID: 517e0c
File 145272402324.png - (19.08KB , 503x415 , ICE-NatTac2-158_5875-jan7-2015.png )
16742
>>16708
I use a Diamond X-300 .. ~100' run of LDF-4-50 to it.
Stub of LMR-400 to the radio. 240 would suffice though.

>>16720
That is next. Wanted to at least get *something* going.
Total investment in the CX to DX project .. ~$110
That includes the CX and expo/hirose cable .. a chip burner, and a couple of blanks from Mouser.
HiRoses for radios were on top of that.
$25 for the Saber one, and like $50 for the one for XTL's
Need to get a Jedi one for the xts's, so that's probably another $25.
BUT, all the cabling and adapters are forward compatible to the 3K+

On a side note, I had a ICE op go down near enough to pick up simplex vhf on my 800 rubber duckie on the scanner .. fired up dsd+ .. Sure as shit .. they still use OFB too
>> No. 16763 ID: 517e0c
File 145315381361.jpg - (2.01MB , 3264x2448 , image.jpg )
16763
>>16564
Not too sure what to tell ya .. My TNC experience is with the one in my deaf TM-D710
And a PTCIIusb Pactor 3 modem for HF on the IC756pro
Although I am sure there is some raspberry pi solution.

MURS is what I use.
Fwiw, P25 has packet data and txt services, built into the standard. Data through the CAI. Voice on IMBE.
Data rates are slowwwwww .. But for slow gps data, nbd.

Pic is the current M family portrait.
>> No. 16764 ID: 6d6cb1
  If you have a few hours to kill.
>> No. 16770 ID: 7b58ca
best newbie radio for under $100?

is this any good?

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00HX03AMA/

Baofeng Black UV-5R V2+ Plus (USA Warranty) Dual-Band 136-174/400-480 MHz FM Ham Two-way Radio, Improved Stronger Case, Enhanced Features
>> No. 16771 ID: 517e0c
  >16770
You get what you pay for ...
>> No. 16772 ID: 7b58ca
>>16771
i am so new that i have no idea what any of that means . . . is anything worth buying for less than or equal to $100?

not trying to be a dick, just want to get in the game.
>> No. 16773 ID: 79b400
>>16772
The Baofeng is good to practice with and learn on.

Once you have an idea what you're doing, it's well worth the money to get a Kenwood or Yaesu and progress from there.

Baofeng is worth the $30 it costs, but you'll definitely want something better after you learn more. Just view it as teaching tool.
>> No. 16774 ID: c77e92
File 145363235182.jpg - (138.14KB , 500x418 , 1-Fullscreen-capture-05102014-52623-PM.jpg )
16774
>>16773
It stays in the pack, and it's got an antenna on it that costs as much as the radio did. I regularly punch out 15+ miles to repeaters, and with CHIRP and the programming cable it's easy to learn. For the money, it's worth it. Then, when your mind is blown with projects, you can go batshit crazy buying radio gear!

Speaking of the Baofeng UV-5R, I put one in the travelling box. Remember the travelling box? So, hey, 7b58ca, if you want to find JonNathe and kick him until the radio falls out of his ass...
>>102523
>> No. 16776 ID: 517e0c
  >>16772
Sorry 'bout that, didn't mean to be a dick either.
They are known for having shitty filtration on their RF output.

Spurs, spurs errywhere.
To put the vid in perspective, one should *usually* only see the 1st and 3rd harmonics. Even then, they should be smaller spikes.
The ~$30 class radios, Baofeng, wouxon, tyt etc, are just that.
Maybe ok as a first radio, but I would recommend saving for something better.

That, and for chrisssakes learn how to program it w/o a computer.
So many people are just appliance ops now. *rant over*

Even the commercial stuff can be had with the proper options for same these days ...
>> No. 16780 ID: 7b58ca
>>16773
>>16776
looks good! i watched a yt video about how to set one of those up (using a computer) as a scanner only. i don't think that i need to be able to transmit right now, and don't want to get into any trouble.

this sounds like a good place to start for me, and then i can learn how to operate the thing, and manually at channels down the road.
>> No. 16781 ID: 254d85
>>16776
The main hitch with programming a Baofeng is that I /always/ forget that to save a repeater offset, you first save the frequency and then have to hit * and then save again to the same memory slot. Or if you know the repeater's receive frequency you can just directly program it in and save it again to the same channel, saves time changing the offset amount/direction options. (a trick is to do this with any out of band frequencies you're saving instead of turning off TX outside of the ham bands, just set the offset to be on 146.520)

And also that you can only save from the top frequency.
>> No. 16819 ID: 254d85
  As a heads up, ICOM just discontinued the IC-7200. HRO still has them in stock for $800.
>> No. 16867 ID: dd78be
Is there any point in taking a look at surplus radios like the clansman series, obviously HAM handhelds are more useful than surplus handhelds/portables, but what about backpack units???
>> No. 16868 ID: 254d85
  >>16867
It depends. Do you want a radio that's going to be more robust than a commercial radio like a KX3 or FT817, but also more limited in features (IIRC a lot of military HF gear doesn't have LSB) and will likely require that you obtain special parts/knowledge to maintain/run it?
>> No. 16869 ID: 08f745
>>16867

Powering surplus radios is also a bit of a challenge, as they use military batteries, and you'd have to do heavier niggerrigging to get them to work. Whereas, you can easily find 12v chargers of different sorts, and cobble together a battery pack rather easily.

The largest thing is that most military units aren't really built for scanning a band to talk to "anyone" as you will actually be doing with amateur radio operations, as even point to point over HF you need a series of frequencies to look at, considering propigation and so on. Same time different day, you may have talked on 40m yesterday but now you need 80 or 160 even today.

It's also much easier and cheaper to get accessories and equipment for civilian equipment, than to do the same for military gear most of the time. Plus, military gear is made with military specifications in mind, which while in some cases (example being prc-148 or 117F) have significant overlap into civilian use should you be able to find them, but they still have limitations in some regards that civvie gear wouldn't have.
>> No. 16871 ID: dd78be
File 145539537460.jpg - (71.56KB , 1280x852 , PRR.jpg )
16871
>>16869
Can you even legally own a MBITR or SINCGARS/ASIP's?

I'm more interested in the British Clansman sets (retired in full in 2010 and completely replaced by the Bowman series, several manpacks exist like the PRC-351), the only more modern military radio you can readily get your hands on besides Clansman series radios is the Marconi/Selex squad level PRR's (see picture)
>> No. 16885 ID: ddcecc
>>16871

Yes. You just can't have the ones with crypto installed. Physically and internally, other than the freq hop/singlechannel encryption capability, it's totally the same radio.

Except that unless you know someone GOOD you're looking at a very VERY large chunk of change.
>> No. 16886 ID: 254d85
>>16885
I've never even seen the "clear" version of the MBITR that Thales makes for non-ITAR/civil sales show up on the market. Maybe in 10 or 20 years when police/fire agencies start changing to whatever it's replacement is.
>> No. 16904 ID: 08f745
>>16886

I'll leave it at "I probably have more connections than you do".

Friends of mine work in the industry and have access to offer them for sale, as well as I have also seen them on access-restricted gear sites, and even on one that I can't recall now in the open.
>> No. 16941 ID: d0041a
>>16904
I've seen the earlier generation large sincgars sets come up for sale from time to time (w/o crypto) on the open market.

As cool as a MBITR sounds, a handheld Yaesu will be more useful
>> No. 17008 ID: 254d85
>>16904
Obviously. And I'm not hugely interested in military gear beyond antique tank radios from WWII, and cold war spy equipment like the modular radios the Germans made for Glaudio.

Anyways. Snapped up a used IC-718 locally. Apparently the previous owner had it as a "backup radio" and only used it for the local emergency nets, so it's pretty much new. Paid $350 for it, so a pretty good deal. I've got a Alinco power supply and a MFJ tuner on the way, I don't have much space for a dipole so I'm probably going to just do a random wire antenna for now.
>> No. 17009 ID: 366e74
File 145798855554.png - (1.60MB , 735x866 , xproperator.png )
17009
<<17008
Nb Nb .. does it have the dsp board in it ? .. if not, they are cheap enough.
I have one in the closet that is a backup to my 756pro, but will probably become the offspring's first hf rig. After passing the test.

I just grabbed a MotoTrbo rig (turnkey $200+50 for cable), for listening to the kids bus drivers and school.
They enabled the "basic privacy" encryption on their radios, which DSD+ won't decode.
The portable has no issue.
The basic privacy has "1-255" as the possible "codes".
For ALL whom have the feature ..... heh, yeah.

Gotta love people who use defaults ;)

As far as I am concerned, it doesn't sound any better than P25.
That and the trbo community has supposedly gone to shit since the glut of chicom gear.

P25 is where my $$ goes
>> No. 17010 ID: 254d85
>>17009
Yes it's one of the newer ones that comes with the DSP as standard.
>> No. 17011 ID: 366e74
Awesome !! Hope ya have a great time with it.
FWIW any of Icom's autotuners will connect to it as well .. The ham-centric AH-4 or any of the AT-120/130/140 series (marine hf units)
>> No. 17012 ID: 254d85
>>17011
Yeah I was thinking of getting a LDG autotuner but ended up going with a MFJ-904, a bit cheaper and I kinda figure I should learn how to use one instead of just pushing a button.
>> No. 17438 ID: d4c8ee
Can anybody comment on the Bearcat 75 or 125? I've decided I'd like to get a scanner so that I can have it monitor the 2m/70cm simplex frequencies, mainly because of how slow the scan function is on Baofengs, and the limited frequency coverage.

One thing I'm mainly interested in is the "close by" function, mainly in how it works, is it effective and can it be set to only respond to memory/band frequencies or does it just respond to anything?
>> No. 17439 ID: f87148
File 146555539721.jpg - (45.88KB , 1223x480 , drunk_hamster_carnival_ride_fan.jpg )
17439
>>17438

I'm not particularly skilled or knowledgeable in the context of amateur radio, but I am a helluva researcher, and your interests happen to at least momentarily coincide with mine, so I'll look into the matter and report back to you.

>One thing I'm mainly interested in is the "close by" function, mainly in how it works, is it effective and can it be set to only respond to memory/band frequencies or does it just respond to anything?

Right off the bat, this sounds prima fascie like something that might operate based on APRS or similar. But again, most of my knowledge is heavily black-boxed, so I'll have to do a bit of reading and get back to you.

Image unrelated and chosen at random nearly at random.
>> No. 17634 ID: d4c8ee
File 14716308541.jpg - (641.64KB , 1644x1644 , UV-5X3(1)LG.jpg )
17634
Baofengtech just brought out a triband version of the UV-5. Does 1.25m offer any benefits or is it mainly just a secondary band to 2 and 70?

https://baofengtech.com/uv-5x3
http://www.miklor.com/COM/Review_5X3.php
>> No. 18086 ID: cdc880
CB, FRS/GMRS regs are being modernized.

http://swling.com/blog/2017/05/fcc-to-legalize-cb-dxing-and-boost-frs-power/

Amongst other things, FRS/GMRS radios will no longer be licensed, just FRS or GMRS only ones, but FRS will be raised to 2w of power. Digital is now allowed on GMRS. Voice scramblers are banned entirely so get some BF-888s while you can I guess.
>> No. 18124 ID: 6b2b62
  If I just want to listen to "local emergency nets" as someone in this thread said, how much should I be willing to spend?
>> No. 18128 ID: 3e9aae
>>18124
Listening to police/fire stuff: $70 scanner if your local departments don't use digital/trunking, $200+ if they do, check Radio Reference.

VHF/UHF: $30 for a Baofeng, if you decide to get a amateur license (free study materials and generally a $15 fee, tech exam is very easy) you might want to consider a entry-level HT from the big 3 like a FT-60 because honestly Baofengs are terrible to program and have poor electronic performance overall.

HF: You could probably put together everything for maybe $500-600 if you can find a good deal for a used IC-718.

Another alternative is getting a USB dongle like a RTL-SDR, which will give you more options for decoding data and so on.
>> No. 18147 ID: 960488
I signed up for the basic HAM license cram-and-test session nearby next month. I took one of the online ham tests and passed without studying, so I imagine with the class I will be just fine.

Anything I should know?

I live in Seattle and want to equip close friends and family with radios in case of yet another power outage or Best Korea sending us a gift. Suggestions on what I should get?
>> No. 18148 ID: 137b94
>>18128
> Baofengs are terrible to program and have poor electronic performance overall.

I've played with a Baofeng.

Jeez, what a piece of shit. Retarded controls, and they feel like a crappy toy.

Seconding the 'Buy a Big 3 radio'. Y'know, Icom, Yaesu, and Kenwood.

Or an Alinco, or Bendix King (also kinda shitty to program but jeez they're robust), or well, anything but a fucking baofeng.

I really hate those stupid fuckers.
>> No. 18164 ID: 0e8e6d
>>18148
Spend the same amount as a Baofeng and get a surplus Motorola XTS3000.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Motorola-XTS-3000-Model-III-H09UCH9PW7AN-800-mhz-Portable-Radio-Lot-of-5-/253058368963
>> No. 18173 ID: 08f745
>>18164

which won't talk to anyone
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