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18065 No. 18065 ID: 80dcf0
Since I know there are some ham radio operators/people familiar with radio tech on here, what's the deal with the 30-87 mhz frequencies used by SINCGARS? From reading ham radio stuff I understand that the low-VHF frequencies like 6m and 10m have extremely variable performance, which I'd imagine would not be desirable for military operations, so why use them for a tactical radio instead of another more stable frequency range?
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>> No. 18066 ID: 5ff353
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18066
>6m and 10m have extremely variable performance

You got that right. But for long distance.

They have very sporadic long distance performance. On summer days, the E-layer of the ionosphere well, ionizes, and then skips are possible. I think the farthest I got on 6m was Enid, Oklahoma, from basically Casa Grande, AZ.

Same goes for 10m. Farthest was North Dakota on E-layer.

However, despite 10m being HF, they both act like regular VHF. Good for local ground-wave stuff, and plenty stable. I could reliably hear the 'local' 10m repeater, about 50 miles away.

I have a feeling the use of these bands dates back to WWII, when the upper end of the VHF spectrum wasn't all that practical for good cheap day-to-day comms.


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