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No. 108081 ID: b27d97
  Why have rifling in pistols, that are designed specifically for civilian edc and self-defense? Wouldn't smoothbores be a better solution since the range at which such pistols are used is minimal and you'd get the benefit of slightly higher muzzle velocity out of the same barrel length.
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>> No. 108084 ID: f2172d
In the US, non-blackpowder smoothbore pistols are typically classified as a 'Any Other Weapon', subject to the rules of the National Firearms Act. Mostly has to do with the ATF considering them as short-barreled shotguns.

Google New England Firearms Handi-Gun, for reference.
>> No. 108085 ID: 9dcda2
File 154640232214.png - (125.81KB , 602x602 , fin stabilized sabot.png )
108085
>>108081
> Wouldn't smoothbores be a better solution

No. Tanks use smoothbore guns to accommodate the fin stabilized discarding sabot rounds. Rifling works really well to stabilize standard projectiles. I can't recall the name, but there was that company that put out smoothbore ARs with little nerf football shaped bullets.

> since the range at which such pistols are used is minimal

Accuracy is important. In a civilian defensive scenario, the saying goes that "There's a lawsuit attached to every stray round." Also, you don't always get to choose your engagement distance. Think about the police officers responding to the North Hollywood shootout.

> and you'd get the benefit of slightly higher muzzle velocity out of the same barrel length.

Pistols really don't have enough velocity to matter. You're throwing a chunk of lead that will impact a target and make a 9-12 mm hole in meat, probably break bones, and penetrate some light barriers. Really unless you hit something important like the heart, central nervous system, or some big arteries, it may not stop an attacker.

https://www.buckeyefirearms.org/alternate-look-handgun-stopping-power

Rifle rounds like 5.56 and 5.45 are entirely dependent on velocity to cause a secondary effect of fragmentation or tumbling once it hits a target. That's why rifle rounds leave a tiny entrance hole and a massive exit hole. (If they exit.)

Brass Fetcher: Discussion on Simulated Shot Lines
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6noiXAFHAE8

https://www.shadowspear.com/2016/06/why-id-rather-be-shot-with-an-ak47-than-an-m4-contains-graphic-images/
>> No. 108086 ID: b27d97
>>108085
>Really unless you hit something important like the heart, central nervous system, or some big arteries, it may not stop an attacker.

Sounds like like a fat long round keyholeing would be just the ticket.
>> No. 108096 ID: b27d97
Any of you guys heard of "Lancaster barrels"?
>> No. 108098 ID: b27d97
  whoa
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