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No. 119516 ID: 733753
  DMX was a hardcore rapper who lived a hard life — and ultimately died from it.

But for true fans, that’s not what he’ll be remembered for.

From his struggles with substance abuse — with an overdose triggering a heart attack that led to his death at 50 on Friday at White Plains Hospital — to his run-ins with the law, he had fallen from the heights that had once made him one of hip-hop’s biggest stars.

However the New York native — born Earl Simmons in Mount Vernon and raised in Yonkers — was as talented as he was troubled. He made his name battling in street circles and had an infamous battle with Jay-Z back in 1993 before the two were famous. He went on to be one of the most successful commercial rappers of all time — for a good reason.

“DMX delivered heartfelt, honest music, the vibration that filled the void after the loss of Tupac [Shakur],” Paradise Gray, chief curator at the Universal Hip Hop Museum (UHHM), told The Post.

And seeing him onstage was a certain kind of magic, added Shawn “Cutman LG” Thomas, head of music programming for the UHHM.

“There is nobody like DMX,” Thomas told The Post. His “energy was just amazing, and it was different from what everybody else was doing. People thought about hip-hop as being negative, but he brought fun to hip-hop.”

Here are eight ways in which DMX changed the rap game. https://nypost.com/2021/04/09/dmx-dead-how-the-ruff-ryder-rapper-made-hip-hop-history/
>> No. 119517 ID: 361788
  >>119516
X will not give it to ya
The pop-pop has stopped, despite the stainless steel
>> No. 119518 ID: a04de9
People once thought that more Americans would become Libertarians when the US became a police state, but now the opposite has happened.

Instead of embracing freedom, Americans love tyranny more.

Since the government has destroyed the economy, Americans accept welfare and think that the state is their protector.

Once tyranny and brainwashing wins, people love their chains and will never love freedom again.

You can be sure that some tears were real when Stalin died.

(Oh, someone wrote a new script for the bot)
(The stuff from 2016 was pretty stale, gookbot.)
>> No. 119519 ID: 7a5d59
>>119518
I'd rather have captcha back.
>> No. 119520 ID: dc43de
>>119519
yeah that stopped working in, oh, 2018.

https://www.programmableweb.com/news/google-recaptcha-v1-api-shutting-down-march-2018/brief/2017/10/24
>> No. 119522 ID: 7a5d59
>>119520
Well isn't there a newer version?


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